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Pilsner Style Beers

Pilsner style beers originate in the Plzeň or Pilsen region of Czech Republic. Mozart spent his summers in Prague, presumably drinking Pilsner beer, and composing great symphonies.This is an excellent summer beer on its own, but we can take this beer in many different directions with our add-on packages. The addition of extra Saaz hops to the primary gives it a more distinct aroma. We also have a special add-pack with malt and 2-stage hops to really increase the complexity. Don't forg...

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POSTED July 14th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS | POST A COMMENT


Priming Your Beer Usin Dry Malt / Honey / Maple Syrup

Priming with dry malt takes longer to carbonate, but will produce a more creamy, dense head. Honey will give beer its distinct flavour. Molasses lends itself to our Porter and Stout recipes. Try priming with brown sugar.  What could be more Canadian than priming your beer with Maple Syrup?Contact our stores for the right amount to use and  the style of beer to match these with.

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POSTED June 26th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS


De-gassing Machines

One of the problems in Calgary and areas at high altitude is the difficulty in removing the C02 gas from the wine after fermentation ceases.We dissuade our customers from beating the gas out of the wine with attachments connected to a drill, as after a number of days with this abuse to the wine, it can make the wine taste "tired" including the loss of  fruit forwardness.  Most of our customers use a Vacuvin to remove the C02 without oxygenating the wine.The rental of our Home Vint...

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POSTED June 11th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS | POST A COMMENT


Liquid Yeast

Seventy percent of the extra flavours in your beer come from the yeast. You will notice a distinct difference  by using an Irish Ale yeast with our Stout recipe  or the Kolsch yeast with our Dutch Lager. Our Belgian Wit recipe just would not be the same without a true Belgian Wit yeast.That is why The Home Vintner carries a wide selection of liquid yeast to choose from to achieve the most from your craft beers. Now available just in time for spri...

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POSTED June 9th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS | POST A COMMENT


The Home Vintner Wine Guild Medals Internationally!

Results have just arrived for the 2015 WineMaker International Amateur Wine Competition and The Home Vintner Wine Guild members scored big netting 12 medals! This year the competition comprised of 2825 entries from 10 different countries with representation from 49 American States and 6 Canadian Provinces. This is the largest and most diverse competition of its kind in the world.  Congratulations go out to:Ken Gibson for his Gold in Fortified, Bronze in Sherry Style, Bronze in Port Style, B...

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POSTED June 1st, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS


Cabernet Sauvignon

Have you ever wondered what makes the same grape varietal from Chile taste so different from, for example, France or California? The short answer is Terroir. For those of you unfamiliar with Terroir, it is the dirt of the geographical location that imparts personality on the vines. Vines, being living creatures, are a product of their environment, from the dirt they are grown in, the climate they are raised in, to the steady guiding hand of the winemaker. Returning to my initial example of...

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POSTED April 14th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS | POST A COMMENT


Ageing gracefully

 Recently, one of our customers brought us a fantastic surprise. A bottle of 1998 Winexpert Selection Petite Sirah! This wine has been discontinued for some years, meaning this wine had been aged for SEVENTEEN years! We couldn't wait to get home and pop the cork that evening. Wow! This delightful wine had aged beautifully, and was as complex and robust as any high end 17 year old commercial variety would be. Deep notes of coffee, cedar nose and intense dar...

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POSTED March 17th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS


A Tale of Three Cabs

Have you ever wondered what makes the same grape varietal from Chile taste so different from, for example, France or California? The short answer is Terroir. For those of you unfamiliar with Terroir, it quite literally means “Dirt”. It is the dirt of the geographical location that imparts personality on the vines. Vines, being living creatures, are a product of their environment, from the dirt they are grown in, the climate they are raised in, to the steady guiding hand of the winema...

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POSTED February 24th, 2015 | 0 COMMENTS


Have a Hoppy Day

It's harvest time for most everything, including the beer makers best friend, hops. Due to a growing demand for the freshest produce available, you might start wondering where the best place is to get your hands on fresh hops. The truth is, they're really hard to find, unless you buy a seasonal beer labelled "wet hopped". These days, most every commercial brewer uses pelletised hops, just like the ones we sell in our stores.Why the pellets? The reasons are mostly practical, and in the interest o...

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POSTED October 1st, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS


Of all the gin-joints in all the towns in all the world

"Of all the gin-joints in all the towns in all the world..."On a road trip with my daughter Anya through southern Spain and Morocco, she took me to Rick's cafe in Casablanca for a belated father's day gift.We watched that old black and white classic movie many times when she was young, and memorized all the lines. It was a great experience for a father and daughter trip.Champagne cocktails to start, and a sampling from the local wine reasons. We were very impressed with the wine.With 'as time go...

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POSTED June 26th, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS


Drinking wine in a Casablancan kasbah

"Drinking wine in a Casablancan kasbah"Grapes began being cultivated in Morocco's Casablanca wine region during the the reign of the Romans at the turn of the previous Milenium, and the French brought their vinoculture expertise during their ongoing influence beginning in the 10th century, the French also invested heavily in Moroccan vineyards in modern times.I'm constantly surprised by the quality and complexity of so many Moroccan wines. Most of the reds tend to be refreshing and low in t...

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POSTED June 24th, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS


The Home Vintner Wine Guild wins International Awards!

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE HOME VINTNER WINE GUILD MEMBERS KEN & DAVE Ken and Dave both entered the 2014 WineMaker International Amateur Wine Competition and came away with medals. Ken was awarded one Gold medal and two Silver medals, and Dave was awarded one Bronze medal. With 3,111 entries representing over seven countries, that is some serious competition. Our congratulations again to our local stars! WinExpert kits placed well internationally, netting 202 awards. LE products won 36 meda...

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POSTED June 10th, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS | POST A COMMENT


Cousiño Macul

Last week, I had the pleasure of visiting one of Chile’s first wineries, the historical Cousiño Macul. Nestled in the beautiful Maipo Valley, this winery boasts 90 year old Cabernet vines, the oldest vines still in production in Chile.The winery derives its name from the founder, Matías Cousiño, and Macul, the name of the estate. Macul is Quechua (an indigenous language) for ‘right hand’, indicating the right side of the river that runs through the Maipo. T...

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POSTED June 2nd, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS


Juice Vs Concentrate: the Grape Debate

 Juice vs concentrate which give you highest quality wine? This is a debate which has existed since the dawn of home winemaking, so really, which is best? First off, both juice kits and concentrate kits can range wildly in quality, so it’s important to find a reputable dealer for either.  Good quality pure juice, of course can yield a fantastic end product, as long as the product is in fact, pure juice from a high quality purveyor.  That being said, The Home Vintner mad...

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POSTED May 8th, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS


Cashews, Nut? Fruit? Apple?

Did you know the popular snack, the Cashew, actually comes from a fruit? The nut itself is attached to the top of the fruit, and when harvested the nut is twisted off and the fruit consumed. They call the fruit part of the cashew the cashew apple. Eating the raw cashew nut, however, can be poisonous and  proper roasting of the nut is necessary to remove a certain chemical similar to that found in poison ivy plants before it can be consumed. From what I gather, this process is very tedious a...

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POSTED March 30th, 2014 | 0 COMMENTS

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